Monthly Archives: January 2014

Armistice screening at Arena Cinema LA on Saturday February 1st

C

Armistice screening this Sat Feb 1 -3:10p in Los Angeles @ArenaScreen BUY TICKETS here: http://tiny.cc/hq1eax 

Leave a comment

Filed under Armistice

Updated Armistice VOD outlets list

P

The following outlets have the Armistice movie released on VOD (Video On Demand) within the United States. Releases in other countries coming soon!

Amazon (Instant Video)
Cablevision (Optimum)
Charter
Comcast (Xfinity)
DirecTV
Google Play
iTunes
Sony (Playstation 3 & 4, PSP, Tablet, etc)
Time Warner Cable
Verizon ViOS
Vudu (Playstation 3, XBOX 360, ROKU, Blu-Ray/TV, ipad, Android, PC)
Walmart
XBOX

Subscribe to the Armistice mailing list for updates about release dates for VOD /Theaters /DVD, interviews, news and more… CLICK HERE

Leave a comment

Filed under Armistice

Interview By Karen Benardello from Yahoo Voices

K

Taking drastic measures in life is a continuous fight not everyone is accustomed to, or ready for, as they strive to accomplish their goals and obtain what they want. Luke Massey, who made his feature film writing, directing, cinematography, editing and producing feature film debuts with the new independent horror thriller, ‘Armistice,’ proved that working hard on something you put your mind can truly lead to your success. Through his troubled main character in the movie, a former military officer who’s forced to fight to the death everyday just to survive, the helmer proved that fighting to move past any obstacles you may face gives you the freedom to truly grow, while also appreciating what you have.

‘Armistice’ follows Royal Marine A.J. Budd (Joseph Morgan), as he wakes in a mysterious house and is forced to fight for his life against inhuman opponents every day. In order to stay alive, A.J. must kill his opponents inside his static prison, from which he is unable to escape. As days turn into years, the isolation and violence threaten his soul.

The only hope A.J. has to stay alive lies in the journals of a former prisoner of the warhouse, World War I officer Lieutenant Edward Sterling (Matt Ryan). A.J. finds Edward’s journals buried behind a secret wall, and the soldier’s writing serves as a mentor to the young marine and help keep him alive. A.J. wonders what happened to Edward, as the endless killing leads him into taking terrible measures.

Massey generously took the time recently to talk about filming ‘Armistice’ over the phone from Britain. Among other things, the filmmaker discussed how, after working as the cinematographer on Morgan and Ryan’s film, ‘Revelation,’ he was finally ready to make his own feature film debut, and create his own unique tale about isolation; how he thinks releasing independent films via Video On Demand helps both viewers and filmmakers, as it allows audiences to watch movie whenever they want, and helps directors gain exposure; and how he rehearsed with Morgan for a week before shooting began, as he feels preparation is crucial in building a movie’s authenticity.

Question (Q): You made your feature film writing and directorial debuts with the horror thriller, ‘Armistice.’ Where you did you come up with the idea for the story overall?

Luke Massey (LM): I had been working as a camera operator, and then went into cinematography. I always planned to direct a film at some stage. I was working as a DP (Director of Photography) on a film (‘With These Hands’) that Joseph Morgan and Matt Ryan were directing and acting in. I thought it was time to make my own movie, and the idea was presented to me by Ben Read, who wrote the script with me. Then I talked to the guys about it, and it all fell in at the right time.

But for my first film, I definitely wanted it to be unique. I wanted it to only feature a few actors and be a bit horror and a bit thriller. I wanted the main thing to be about isolation. When it all came together, they seemed like the perfect ones to do it.

Q: Like you mentioned, besides directing the film, you co-wrote the script with Benjamin Read. What was your collaboration with Benjamin as you were writing the script?

LM: Well, Ben writes graphic novels, and he likes comics. So he came up with the idea, and I brought in the knowledge I had of making films. So it was quite an easy relationship. He was mainly writing it, but I was helping to put it into film language. We’ve become best friends, and we’ve worked together since. It was a lot of fun. Ben’s on his third graphic novel now, and he’s become very successful writing comics.

Q: What was the casting process like for Joseph Morgan? Since he’s the sole actor on screen for most of the film, how did you come to decide on him for the role?

LM: Well, after doing the film he was directing and acting in, Matt was producing and I was working as the DP on, I just thought Joseph was an extraordinary actor. We talked, and I said, “I would really like to do a film with you guys.”

So Joe and Matt were on board before we even had the script. I knew I definitely wanted to do the film with them. The next stage was trying to find a script we all wanted to make. I had a couple ideas, and ‘Armistice’ was the third idea. We were all on board from that stage on.

I was really more interested in working with Joe and Matt than what type of film we would be making. As many people know now, Joe’s a fantastic actor; he’s very diverse, and he’s got a great on-screen presence.

Q: Were you able to have any rehearsal periods with Joe and Matt before you began shooting the film?

LM: Yes, Joe and I spent a week together, but finding time with Matt was a little more difficult. So I was only able to rehearse with Matt over the phone, which is quite a weird experience. We didn’t even use Skype; we just rehearsed over the mobile, essentially.

But I had the week with Joe, and then he went to film ‘Ben Hur’ in Morocco, and he was there for six weeks. But we spoke every other day. Then when he came back, we spent a couple nights together in a house, just us two. We just tested out some things and played around. So that was really useful.

But I definitely like having a week of rehearsal, and so does Joe. I think most actors would like as much rehearsal time as possible, because it’s really crucial. The best way to get the greatest out of the actor and film is to do enough prep work.

Q: Besides writing and directing the film, you also served as one of the producers on ‘Armistice.’ Did you feel that producing the movie influenced the way you penned and helmed the movie?

LM: It was quite good. I produced the pre-production mainly, and then when it came time to actually shoot the film, I mainly focused on directing the movie. We had a couple other producers come on during pre-production, like Mark Kendrick, who edited the film, as well.

There were so many of us producers, and I probably did the least out of all of us. There was so much work done by all of us, and it was a real team effort. It didn’t really distract me, because there were always people around to carry on in any way, or to help you out. So we were lucky to have so many people involved who were committed to the film. So it wasn’t really a weight on my shoulders, at all.

Q: The movie is currently playing on VOD, and opens in theaters on January 31. Are you personally a fan of watching films On Demand, and why do you think it’s a good platform for independent movies like ‘Armistice?’

LM: Yes, I am now, and I think it’s really important. I think the producers, distributors and people making the movie make more money by releasing their projects On Demand, so that they can continue making films. I know services like Apple TV, and you have DirecTV in the States, are crucial, because you can go in and watch a movie when you can at home. Not everyone has the chance to go to the cinema; going to the cinema a couple times a year is a massive luxury for me.

If I finish everything at 12 at night, and want to watch a film, I can just flick on the TV. So you can watch a movie when you have time, and I think a lot of people are very busy now. So from that aspect, I think it’s really good. I also think the coverage is really good, especially since more money is going back to the people making the films, and they can carry on making more movies.

Q: Like you mentioned earlier, you were the DP on the film you worked on that Joseph directed, and you also served as the cinematographer on ‘Armistice.’ Why did you also decide to serve as the DP on this movie, and what was the aspect of working on so many aspects of the thriller?

LM: Well, I have that experience working as the cinematographer, so it came naturally to me. I didn’t really bother looking outside to find someone else to do it, because I was keen on doing it. I really enjoy it; I’ve done it twice, and have now directed three films. It comes naturally to me.

But it’s really hard work, so you have to have a good camera team. You’re not going to be with them all the time, so you have to have people who support you; it’s like being in a family. They have to support you, because you have so much going on.

Inspiration for the lighting came from several cinematographers, including Roger Deakins, as well as graphic novelist Shaun Tan. He wrote ‘The Arrival,’ and I pretty much based the whole look of the movie on that graphic novel. Cinematography is one of my favorite areas, and it’s where I spent 15 years.

Q: For the next film you’re working on, the drama ‘500 Miles North,’ you’re also going to be serving in many different areas, including directing, writing, cinematography, editing and producing, and you’ll be reuniting with Joseph and Matt on that film, as well. Where did you come up the inspiration for the movie, and why did you decide to reunite with the two of them?

LM: As soon as we finished filming ‘Armistice,’ we decided to work on another film together. As soon as we finish ‘500,’ we’re going to make another one. I think every couple years we’ll all get together again to make another film.

The idea for ‘500’ came from the relationships I had with my dad and brother. It’s basically a drama about family, and I think it’s like ‘Little Miss Sunshine.’ Everyone can relate to that kind of story, and getting over a tragedy in your family. It can tear about a family, but the family can then reunite. So I’m really excited about it, and we’ve already finished editing it. So that should be out at the end of this year.

Leave a comment

Filed under 500 miles north, Armistice

Armistice selected for the 39th Boston Science Fiction Film Festival

ARMISTICE_ONESHEET_laurels

Armistice will play at the 39th Boston Science Fiction Film Festival, taking place February 7 – 17 in Somerville, MA, at the historic Somerville Theatre in Davis Square. More information including screening times to follow soon!

Leave a comment

Filed under Armistice

Updated Armistice VOD outlets list

P

The following outlets have the Armistice movie released on VOD (Video On Demand) within the United States. Releases in other countries coming soon!

Amazon (Instant Video)
Cablevision (Optimum)
Comcast (Xfinity)
DirecTV
Google Play
iTunes
Sony (Playstation 3 & 4, PSP, Tablet, etc)
Verizon ViOS
Vudu (Playstation 3, XBOX 360, ROKU, Blu-Ray/TV, ipad, Android, PC)
Walmart
XBOX

Subscribe to the Armistice mailing list for updates about release dates for VOD /Theaters /DVD, interviews, news and more… CLICK HERE

Leave a comment

Filed under Armistice

Interview By Christine Hadden from The Crypt

B

TEN QUESTIONS WITH……LUKE MASSEY Interview by Christine Hadden Today we have an interview with writer/director Luke Massey, who has given us the compelling just-released (VOD) film Armistice, starring Joseph Morgan (The Vampire Diaries, The Originals) and Matt Ryan.

1) First, for those who don’t know, can you give us the premise of Armistice?

Royal Marine A.J Budd (Joseph Morgan) awakes in a mysterious house and is forced to fight for his life everyday against grotesque inhuman opponents. Trapped alone in an unchanging prison of unbreakable routines, he must kill everyday or die himself. As days stretch into years, the isolation and unceasing violence threaten his very soul. The only note of hope lies in the journals of a former prisoner of the house, WW1 officer Lieutenant Edward Sterling (Matt Ryan). Discovered behind a secret wall, Sterling’s diaries serve as a mentor to the young marine and help to keep him alive, but what dark fate befell their author?

2) Tell us a little bit about your own background. You’re British, correct? How did your love of film guide you into the business?

Yes I’m British. My dad was an actor so I think I was always destined to work in film or theatre in some way. As a kid I used to go on set with him or backstage at the theatre when he was doing a play and from a very early age knew that’s what I wanted to do. My brother actually wanted to be the director and I an actor; we used to make lots of short films as a kid and watch two or three films a day. My brother fell out of love with it so gave me all his books on filmmaking and I never looked back. My brother works in politics now.

3) This is your first film and you tackled both writing and directing, among other roles. In hindsight, was that a lot to take on or did it make it easier to bring your personal vision to the film?

Until recently I didn’t think so but after being just the DOP on Joseph’s short film revelation and seeing him just direct it seemed like an easier and more productive way of working. I’ve done the same on our next feature 500 Miles North and I’m considering doing it one more time on our third film this year but after that I doubt I’ll do anything else other then directing. I know the actors I work with would like me to do less and I enjoy working with them most of all so I probably will.

4) Did your previous work as a DOP help you to be more expressive and sure of yourself as a director?

I think it definitely made me more sure of myself. I started working professionally as a camera trainee when I was 16 so had ten years of experience behind me before I directed Armistice. Before working with Joseph and Matt Ryan I didn’t think much about working with actors but while doing their short film ‘With These Hands’ I got an education in what real acting was, they blew my mind and got me into reading the likes of Stanislavski and his method. I went from being a very technical director to an actors director thanks to them.

5) What was your biggest challenge in terms of the short running time of the film, and keeping your favorite scenes off the cutting room floor?

The original cut was 4 hours and had several more characters in it including a viking, a knight and a mute girl who is played by one of the greatest actors I’ve ever worked with. Cutting her out was heartbreaking, I still watch the scenes now and I’m still gutted I couldn’t make them work in the cut. I think every filmmaker goes through this and you have to do what’s best for the film.

6) Many fans will recognize Joseph Morgan from his role as baddie vampire on both The Vampire Diaries and The Originals.  What can you tell us about his role in Armistice and about Joseph himself?

It’s a hard role to play. It’s a blank canvas, AJ Budd is a man who can’t remember who he is, where he’s from, not even his own name and that’s just the starting point. You then watch him trapped in this awful house for four or five years having to kill everyday and you can just see his humanity drain away. I think Jo would agree it’s one of the most challenging parts he’s ever played and one of his greatest performances, he really knocked it out of the park. As for Joseph he’s a cool cat, a good friend and one of the funniest guys I know, which is something I don’t think comes across in many interviews. We are constantly laughing and messing around on set. I’ve worked with Joseph and Matt on two features and two shorts within the last five years and they’ve been some of the best times of my life both professionally and personally.

7) Armistice was originally titled Warhouse, which some readers may have been familiar with already. Why the name change?

In all honesty it was a number of things War Horse didn’t bloody help hahaha It’s still called Warhouse in Russia and someone on twitter sent me a photo of the title which I appreciated.

8) Haha! I thought of that War Horse reference as well! Would you classify Armistice as strictly horror, and do you think horror will be your genre of choice or do you see yourself spreading your wings to work on other types of films?

I think it’s a thriller, it’s more of a war movie then a horror but think it’s a got a bit of everything which isn’t a bad thing. My next film ‘500 Miles North’, which we’ve just finished editing, is a road move in the same vein as Little Miss Sunshine or Darjeeling LTD. It stars both Joseph and Matt again and is a very personal story reflecting on my relationship with my brother and father. I do love horror movies though and we are planning to film an all out Wickerman type horror in June.

9) What would you say your biggest challenges were with Armistice?

I don’t want to give anything away to those who have not seen it, but it’s a fierce yet stunning film! Thanks for saying that. You’re always a bit nervous about what people will think. The biggest challenge was making a film with largely no dialogue with two actors who for the most part have to act on their own. That was a big challenge, but with actors like Joseph and Matt it made things a lot easier.

10) Is the film getting a wide release? Any particulars on the DVD release yet? And what is next for Luke Massey?

31st March will be a general release and someone tweeted me a link to it on Amazon already so you can pre-order it now. Next for me is overseeing the selling of 500 Miles North and the start of pre-production on our third film which is the wickerman type horror.

Again, thanks so much for your time! And I have to encourage everyone to check out Armistice – and keep your eyes on Luke Massey in the future!

Leave a comment

Filed under Armistice

More exclusive clips from Armistice up online

D

Luke Massey’s supernatural thriller Armistice is already out on VOD and will start a theatrical run on January 31st. Xlrator Media is releasing the film through their horror label Macabre. We have been given an exclusive clip to share with you and perhaps whet your appetite for more.

In the role of Royal Marine, A.J. Budd, Joseph Morgan stars in this brutal psychological and supernatural thriller, in which he finds himself trapped in the Warhouse. Imprisoned, he is forced to fight for his life against grotesque, inhuman opponents. He must kill every day or die himself. His one glimmer of hope comes in the form of a diary, left by a former occupant of the house, WWI Lieutenant Edward Sterling, played by Matt Ryan.

The film stars Joseph Morgan (Klaus on the CW’s Vampire Diaries and spin-off series The Originals, Immortals), Matt Ryan, and William Troughton.

Watch the clip here.

By Andrew Mack @ TwitchFilm.com

Directed by Luke Massey, ARMISTICE is described as; In the role of Royal Marine, A.J. Budd, Joseph Morgan stars in this brutal psychological and supernatural thriller, in which he finds himself trapped in the Warhouse. Imprisoned, he is forced to fight for his life against grotesque, inhuman opponents. He must kill every day or die himself. His one glimmer of hope comes in the form of a diary, left by a former occupant of the house, WWI Lieutenant Edward Sterling, played by Matt Ryan.

This looks like a fun little monster flick. It’s being released on VOD on January 7, 2014 and in theaters on January 31, 2014. Here’s the clip!

By Ambush Bug @ aintitcool.com

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Armistice